Tag Archives: Philippine stamps

The meiLBOX 5+1 Project sends out the first 5 letters via Post!

If you are one of my regular visitors, you must know already about the small project that I have launched very recently. :) It is The meiLBOX 5+1 Project (click here to know more about it) and I continue to humbly appeal for your help in spreading the word around.

The First 5 Letters on their Way to My Friends! (Photo taken through HTC Tattoo)

Anyway, with hubby in tow, I mailed the first 5 letters that I have written for this Project, via the Post Office in Cubao (near Cubao Expo) last Friday. I hope that my five friends (the lucky ones?!) who will receive my letters will be surprised and then, upon knowing that they are left with no other choice but to follow the meiLBOX instructions, would be happy to write and mail their five letters and plant their trees, too! :)

That day was particularly hot and humid so it was even more challenging to walk the extra mile, as the cliche goes. However, it made the experience more memorable and fun because we literally had to sweat it out! It was also nice to see authentic postal stamps again! The ones that were issued to me (priced at PhP 7.00 per stamp) had an image of a clownfish (or anemonefish) on them. Most likely, you are aware of or have watched the Disney film, Finding Nemo. The cute Nemo in that film is a clownfish.

You might be wondering why a clownfish would appear in a Philippine stamp. I checked the Philippine Postal Corporation (Philpost) website and found out that they issued this stamp and several others in 2010 and 2011, to promoteĀ Philippine Marine Biodiversity. You can find more information here and here. I enjoyed browsing the Philpost website as I had also collected stamps when I was in high school and college (I pray that my stamp albums are still in a safe place!). Hubby and I are dog-lovers so we were glad to know that dogs were also featured in Philippine stamps! Here is the link to know more about the stamp series on dogs.

You can paste this meiLBOX 5+1 sticker on your letter envelopes. You can email me directly if you want to have a copy of the PDF file so you can print copies of this sticker at home. (Image of the Phil. stamps courtesy of Mr. Alex Moises. Image of the tree courtesy of rugbyipd.com.)

You can paste this meiLBOX 5+1 sticker on your letter envelopes. You can email me directly if you want to have a copy of the PDF file so you can print copies of this sticker at home. (Image of the Phil. stamps courtesy of Mr. Alex Moises. Image of the tree courtesy of rugbyipd.com.)

By the way, I came up with a sticker for the Project so you may want to email me through meilbox5plus1.project@asyanna.net or the.meilbox.project@gmail.com if you want to use this sticker for your letter envelopes. I can send you a PDF file so you can print it and enjoy the stickers as well. I spent a lot of time in my search for an old Philippine stamp with an image of a tree on it and my efforts were eventually rewarded because I was led to these 1950-issued stamps (priced at 2 and 5 centavos!). They are beautiful stamps featuring Red Lauan trees and issued to commemorate the 15 years of the then Philippine Forest Service (Source: World Forestry in Stamps, FAO, found at http://www.fao.org/docrep/x5383e/x5383e03.htm). Hopefully, I can still find authentic copies so I can include them in my collection. (Thanks to the owner of this image, Alex Moises with url at http://alexmoises.tripod.com/id262.html as well as to the FAO.)

All it takes is to send out 5 letters and plant 1 tree! (Photo taken through HTC Tattoo)

Before I end this post, I like to invite all of you again to join The meiLBOX 5+1 Project and together, let us revive the art of letter-writing, bring smiles to the face of our friends and family members, and plant more trees!

For a greener, cleaner, and happier Mother Earth, let’s count 5+1 now!

P.s. Watch out for my next post when I discuss the best tree species for both urban and rural set-ups.

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